An FX Parity Play post Brexit

Could Brexit push EURUSD, GBPUSD, and EURGBP to Parity in 2020 …or sooner?

The tea leaves in the UK are wilting fast as the Brexit deadline is fast approaching. While goblins and ghosts will be meandering the streets in the US on Halloween night (October 31), the UK will be bracing for the scare of the century, namely, a possible departure from the EU. Leading the charge are two factors: Boris Johnson’s ego and the fear of Labor Leader Jeremy Corbyn becoming the next PM. Both outcomes are down right scary!

Mired within the cross hairs of British politics lies the uncertain future of Sterling and the Euro. Both currencies stand to lose value against the USD and other safe haven currencies, i.e. CHF and JPY). At the very least traders can expect lows to be tested once again. Here’s why…

Since Trump took office, investors have been living a new economic normal that has yet to be fully reflected in global currency values. As a result, central bank reactions have varied widely.

As of late… Mario Draghi has renewed QE efforts creating more ‘easy money’. Jerome Powell is patching up a US short term liquidity issue with a QE-like repeat performance. GDP numbers are dropping due to unresolved US-China talks on trade tariffs. Major European banks and pension funds are choking up against EU’s negative interest rates. Worse of all, global monetary policy tools that central banks once relied on to maintain economic stability are no longer effective. These and other factors are pushing economic leaders to compete on the basis of their devalued currency rather than optimal resource allocations and coordinated globalization.

This relentless ‘race-to-the-bottom’ syndrome among central bankers has investors worried and will very likely be the root cause for a potential parity FX play against the USD in the months ahead.

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© 2019 Tom Kadala

How to FX Brexit…

From the RagingFX Trading Desk…

The jury is finally out. Parliament has for the second time voted down Theresa May’s tentative Brexit agreement. Despite recently acquired legal assurances from Brussels of a limited back stop with Ireland, a major sticking point, the British Parliament would have nothing more to do with May’s two years of haggling with EU negotiators. What lies ahead is most certainly the growing uncertainty of the British economy.

Just as most FX traders have been baffled by the recent strength in the dollar, they have also shaken their heads in disbelief at Sterling’s rise. On the dollar, some argue that the dovish outlook from Powell and the disappointing 20,000 NFP numbers from last Friday hide the fact that the USD is fairing out better than its peers, …hence the show of strength is really ‘relative’ strength from an overall decline.

To some degree, could the same be said about Sterling’s recent strength? The UK economy is firing on all pistons fueled by historically low unemployment numbers and an increase in tax revenues from earlier this year. But, here is where the difference lies. Sterling’s ‘relative strength’ comes from an artificial demand founded upon frenzy, stockpiling efforts from both consumers and government buyers living in fear of a ‘no deal’ Brexit.

After March 29 when Article 50 is to be invoked, the British economy will return to a lower equilibrium point. The irony is that it no longer matters if Brexit is approved or not; nor if there’s a ‘no deal’ Brexit, a second referendum, or new elections. The damage to the UK economy has already been done, because it will take months to work through the artificially bloated inventory of goods, especially among soon-to-be tight fisted consumers living in fear of losing their jobs to a forthcoming recession. Add unprecedented political uncertainty of the likes not seen for decades and Sterling strength will undoubtedly be short lived.

On the near term, we expect Cable to trade with high levels of volatility within a 1.30 to 1.35 range to start. Over the mid term… look for eventual spikes to give way to a predominant downtrend where it will potentially test a 1.14 low.

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© 2019 Tom Kadala

Hanging in the Balance for FX Traders… Brexit, Trump’s Tariff Threats, and the EU’s unprecedented Plea

From the RagingFX Trading Desk…

Dominating headlines for this week include Brexit, China, and Germany. Here’s is our take for the weeks ahead…

On the Brexit front we anticipate an extension to the March 29, 2019 hard deadline for at least another year. The EU will be holding their elections in May, which will hamper a second referendum attempt. Keeping the status quo, at this juncture, we believe is what is best for both sides, which will most likely secure Theresa May’s role as PM for the near future.

This past weekend Germany caved after witnessing Theresa May’s historic Parliamentary loss of support for the current Brexit proposal. Merkel’s supposed successor, Karrenbauer, issued an unprecedented, emotional plea from the CDU asking the UK to reconsider reentry. The $120b investments and more than twice that in trade exchange value between both countries are weighing heavily on the minds of German leaders.

If you agree that Germany holds the purse strings for the EU, this gesture has significant ramifications politically. If cooler heads prevail, both sides will seek remedies behind closed doors that should buy more time for negotiations.

What does all this mean for FX traders?

Going forward, we see a global recession triggered by the tariff war between the US and China. This morning the latest IMF global predictions concur. China’s debt levels will continue to rise as the government continues to release more funds into the economy. The resulting inflation will depreciate the Renminbi against the US Dollar. In addition, the slowing Chinese economy will dampen commodity demand, which in turn, will hurt emerging markets, all of which will eventually lead to urgent bail outs of their respective dollar denominated liabilities. Those governments saddled with Chinese loans may have little recourse, since the IMF will not recognize Beijing’s competing alternative, the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank.

In this economically declining scenario, the USD will remain strong at least for a few more quarters due to the current economic momentum. On the mid to long term, we would not be surprised to see the Euro reach parity with the USD as the EU seeks to rebalance its tariff-stricken industries.

© 2018 Tom Kadala

Powell’s Debut Rattles FOREX Currency Markets

Powell’s first news conference was definitely a switch from the scripted presentations given by his predecessor, Janet Yellen. Despite the difference in style, the message was clear: interest rates are on the rise, unemployment is at historic lows, and what remains to be seen are wage increases followed by an increase in productivity, otherwise, we can expect another recessionary pull back.

What does that mean for Forex traders?

Today we saw the dollar weaken against most currencies. At first it may seem counterintuitive for a currency with a rate increase to fall favor with traders, however, this anomaly is actually a repeat performance from previous USD rate rises. There are numerous academic arguments to support the pull back, however, our favorite is what we have heard from top traders at Goldman Sachs, “it’s just what happens.”.

From a more academic perspective, the 10-year T-Bills at 2.9% are teetering upon a psychological level of 3% where traders and investors believe the US stock markets may stall the longest bull market on record or even reverse it. Their argument is largely supported by the increasing default exposure from emerging countries such as Turkey, which have funded their long term projects with US Dollar denominated short term debt. As rates increase, their dollar denominated interest payments increase accordingly and become harder to pay back. The same is true with US credit card holders. In addition, as US consumer debt levels continue to surge, default levels may reach new levels at home, which could potentially stall the consumer retail engine that represents 70% of the US GDP.

With this unsettling USD backdrop, the GBP (British Sterling) is gaining unexpected strength against both the Euro and the USD. Recent developments between the two Brexit negotiators, Davis and Barnier, arrived yesterday with the usual British pomp and circumstance but in reality only delivered an extension of one year to the status quo. Some progress may have been made on some fronts, but the number of unresolved issues hasn’t changed significantly. Only the final Brexit date was moved to 2020. All of these shenanigans may be negotiating tactics of sorts, but at the end of the day, the feeling one can get from the very strained discussions between Westminster and Brussels is that eventually a referendum will be reintroduced in favor of the ‘Remains’.

Brussels’ negotiating tactics involve a high level of tolerance with little meaningful progress. They are letting this inevitable scenario play itself out. Unfortunately for Britain, when their leaders finally do choose to rejoin the EU (in whatever capacity), they will have gained less for their economy than what they had in place prior to triggering Brexit.

© 2018 Tom Kadala